archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

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A face carved into a tree trunk was discovered by forestry workers in a remote location up Toba Inlet. It had been staring down an ancient river valley in the rainforest for almost 200 years.

The recent chance discovery was made approximately 60 miles up the inlet and helped to silence a question of doubt regarding the geographic limits of Klahoose First Nation traditional territory.

What a creepy cool discovery to make in the middle of nowhere.

The article goes on to say that the tree was “removed from the site” to a community center, which I really hope means that it was relocated root ball & all, because cutting it down now after such a life would be so unfair. 

fuckyeahvikingsandcelts

hezoo:

odditiesoflife:

Puzzlewood Magical Forest — The Real Middle Earth

Puzzlewood is a unique and enchanting place, located in the beautiful and historic Forest of Dean in Gloucestershire, England. There is more than a mile of meandering pathways through Puzzlewood and over 14 acres of ancient woodland. It has an atmosphere quite unlike any other wood. The magical forest is one of the most stunning in the world and it’s easy to see why it’s been used as a filming location for Merlin and Dr. Who. It is no wonder that JRR Tolkien is reputed to have taken his inspiration for the fabled forests of Middle Earth from Puzzlewood. 

In Puzzlewood you will find strange rock formations, secret caves and ancient trees. The geological features here are known locally as scowles. The scowles originated through the erosion of natural underground cave systems formed in limestone many millions of years ago. Uplift and erosion caused the cave system to become exposed at the surface. This was then exploited by Iron Age settlers through to Roman times for the extraction of iron ore.

Evidence of Roman occupation of the area is supported by the discovery of a hoard of over 3,000 Roman coins from the 3rd Century which were found in the scowles of Puzzlewood. Once the Romans left, nature reclaimed the old workings with moss and trees, to create the unique landscape. The historical use soon became forgotten, and the folklore of “Puzzlewood” began.

In the early 1800s, a local landowner laid down a mile of pathways which meandered through the trees and gulleys to open up this ancient forest originally for the amusement of his friends and children. In the early 1900s, Puzzlewood opened to the public. Since then it is has remained essentially unchanged with the same stunning pathways and bridges as in earlier times, but with the addition of a variety of animals and visitor facilities.

source 1, 2

I’d like to take a trip here sometime please

I want to go to there so hard!

invisibleforeigner

But Christianity’s most offensive tenet by far has nothing to do with the virgin birth or the resurrection of the dead, but the first half of John 3:16: For God so loved the world. There will never be proof of that, though some see it in trees.

How can we know this God exists? We cannot. Only that sometimes, some days, some of us sense an absence, which feels very much like presence. It stings the eyes, we blink, and see lights and heroes all around us.

Megan Hustad, More Than Conquerers (via invisibleforeigner)

kite photography by Gerco de Ruijter turns landscapes into art:

1 - The Netherlands 2008
2 - The Netherlands 2008
3 - Centre Pivot Irrigation 2012 - Contact Sheet #3
4 - Iceland 2009 - Take Root
5 - Death Valley 2005
6 - Death Valley 2007
7 - E.M.O. Maasvlakte Rotterdam 2000
8 - The Netherlands 1997
9 - The Netherlands 1997
10 - The Netherlands 1997

There were so many more I wish I could have fit into this photoset.

livinginghostcolours

Rainbow Eucalyptus, is the only species of eucalyptus that grows in the northern hemisphere and is normally grown for its pulpwood, used to create white paper. But why does it look like it’s been painted?  The secret behind the Rainbow Eucalyptus is that the trees shed multiple patches of bark every year, but not at the same time. As the patches are gone, the green inner bark is exposed, and as it matures it turns bluish, then orange, purple and maroon. This creates the rainbow effect.

Everyone should know about rainbow eucalyptus.

Rainbow Eucalyptus, is the only species of eucalyptus that grows in the northern hemisphere and is normally grown for its pulpwood, used to create white paper. But why does it look like it’s been painted?  The secret behind the Rainbow Eucalyptus is that the trees shed multiple patches of bark every year, but not at the same time. As the patches are gone, the green inner bark is exposed, and as it matures it turns bluish, then orange, purple and maroon. This creates the rainbow effect.

Everyone should know about rainbow eucalyptus.