letsprocrastinap

biomedicalephemera:

Have some time on your hands? Know how to read? Want to help science?

Join me at the Smithsonian Digital Volunteers Transcription Center!

There are thousands of collection items, field journals, and cataloged diaries and specimens at the Smithsonian, and because the pages and data are hand-written or irregular, digital transcription is unable to decode them.

This is where the Digital Volunteers come in! By transcribing and double-checking the transcription efforts of others prior to final review by Smithsonian staffers, we save the Smithsonian thousands of hours of initial squinting and trying to make sense of semi-illegible words.

Cursive is largely not taught in schools anymore, but the scientific value of these documents and specimens will still be true long after we’re gone. By transcribing things now and getting them into a digital database that can be searched and organized, scientists and historians of both tomorrow and decades in the future will benefit.

There are more difficult transcription pieces (such as the top page posted here), as well as very simple and easy-to-read pieces, such as The Bumblebee Project (SO MANY BEES).

This is where I procrastinate, these days. It’s strangely addicting.

Don’t mind if I do.

letsprocrastinap
scienceyoucanlove:

Awesome shot of a healing wound Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a healing wound on the skin. There are red blood cells (erythrocytes) on the skin’s surface.Keratinocytes (skin cells that contain the protein keratin, centre) are forming a hard protective layer (scab) over the wound.Magnification x400, by Steve Gschmeissner
text source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Awesome shot of a healing wound 

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a healing wound on the skin. There are red blood cells (erythrocytes) on the skin’s surface.

Keratinocytes (skin cells that contain the protein keratin, centre) are forming a hard protective layer (scab) over the wound.

Magnification x400, by Steve Gschmeissner

text source 

northeastnature
northeastnature:

Here’s something a little different. The lines on this rocky hill are glacial striations: scratches caused by debris stuck in flowing glaciers. What’s even cooler is that you can see the paths of three different glacial movements here:
One set of lines is from the broad glacial flow that buried the whole region,
One is from the later, diminished flow that was boxed in by the surrounding mountains, and
One is from the even more diminished flow from ice that was trapped in this one valley.

northeastnature:

Here’s something a little different. The lines on this rocky hill are glacial striations: scratches caused by debris stuck in flowing glaciers. What’s even cooler is that you can see the paths of three different glacial movements here:

  1. One set of lines is from the broad glacial flow that buried the whole region,
  2. One is from the later, diminished flow that was boxed in by the surrounding mountains, and
  3. One is from the even more diminished flow from ice that was trapped in this one valley.
thecryptocreep

markscherz:

rhamphotheca:

2 New Species of Helmetcrest Hummingbirds (amongst others) Recognized From South America

L - Buffy Helmetcrest (Oxypogon stubelii). Endemic to Colombia, located in the central mountain range (the paramos surrounding the Parque los Nevados). Photos: Oswaldo Cortés

R - White-bearded Helmetcrest (Oxypogon linden), endemic to Venezuela and only present in the Andes of Venezuela. Photo - Peter Boesman

(read more: ProAves)

You guys don’t understand how rare it is to find new hummingbirds. There are over 300 species recognised, and the majority of them were described before the turn of the nineteenth century!

sambolic
Behavioral scientists routinely publish broad claims about human psychology and behavior in the world’s top journals based on samples drawn entirely from Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic (WEIRD) societies. Researchers - often implicitly - assume that either there is little variation across human populations, or that these “standard subjects” are as representative of the species as any other population. Are these assumptions justified? Here, our review of the comparative database from across the behavioral sciences suggests both that there is substantial variability in experimental results across populations and that WEIRD subjects are particularly unusual compared with the rest of the species - frequent outliers. The domains reviewed include visual perception, fairness, cooperation, spatial reasoning, categorization and inferential induction, moral reasoning, reasoning styles, self-concepts and related motivations, and the heritability of IQ. The findings suggest that members of WEIRD societies, including young children, are among the least representative populations one could find for generalizing about humans. Many of these findings involve domains that are associated with fundamental aspects of psychology, motivation, and behavior - hence, there are no obvious a priori grounds for claiming that a particular behavioral phenomenon is universal based on sampling from a single subpopulation. Overall, these empirical patterns suggests that we need to be less cavalier in addressing questions of human nature on the basis of data drawn from this particularly thin, and rather unusual, slice of humanity. We close by proposing ways to structurally re-organize the behavioral sciences to best tackle these challenges.
infinity-imagined
The Milky Way Galaxy is one of billions, perhaps hundreds of billions of galaxies notable neither in mass nor in brightness nor in how its stars are configured and arrayed. Some modern deep sky photographs show more galaxies beyond the Milky Way than stars within the Milky Way. Every one of them is an island universe containing perhaps a hundred billion suns. Such an image is a profound sermon on humility.
atlasobscura
theatlantic:

Scientists Made Color-Changing Paint Out of Gold Nanoparticles

Something unexpected happened when scientists at the University of California, Riverside, started stringing together nanoparticles of gold. 
The gold wasn’t golden anymore. It changed colors. 
"When we see these gold particles aggregate, we find out they have very, very beautiful blue colors," chemist Yadong Yin told me. That bright blue would dissipate like a sunset—morphing into purple, then red—when scientists warped the strings, breaking apart the nanoparticles.

The finding was one of those happy scientific accidents that turns into something bigger. “So after we found out the reason why they show blue colors and what the structure was, then we started to think what kind of use they could have,” Yin said.
What Yin and his colleagues came up with: Sensors made of gold nanoparticles that change colors as you press on them. Think of it as a Hypercolor—those color-changing T-shirts all the cool kids had in the ’90s—but for touch instead of heat.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]


Pretty cool article.  Hits a lot of my niche interest targets. 

theatlantic:

Scientists Made Color-Changing Paint Out of Gold Nanoparticles

Something unexpected happened when scientists at the University of California, Riverside, started stringing together nanoparticles of gold. 

The gold wasn’t golden anymore. It changed colors. 

"When we see these gold particles aggregate, we find out they have very, very beautiful blue colors," chemist Yadong Yin told me. That bright blue would dissipate like a sunset—morphing into purple, then red—when scientists warped the strings, breaking apart the nanoparticles.

The finding was one of those happy scientific accidents that turns into something bigger. “So after we found out the reason why they show blue colors and what the structure was, then we started to think what kind of use they could have,” Yin said.

What Yin and his colleagues came up with: Sensors made of gold nanoparticles that change colors as you press on them. Think of it as a Hypercolor—those color-changing T-shirts all the cool kids had in the ’90s—but for touch instead of heat.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

Pretty cool article.  Hits a lot of my niche interest targets.