runningupthestepsofomnibuses
halftheskymovement:

In 1873, Harvard gynecologist Edward H. Clarke wrote that women who went to college risked “neuralgia, uterine disease, hysteria, and other derangements of the nervous system.” In his words, a woman’s “system never does two things well at the same time.”
Meet Anandibai Joshi, Keiko Okami and Sabat Islambouli, three women who defied gender norms and became the first licensed female doctors in their respective countries: India, Japan and Syria. They graduated  from the first women’s medical college in the world — the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania — at a time when women in America couldn’t vote. Joshi, the best known of the three, was married off at the age of nine, to a 20-year-old man. After losing her 10-day-old baby at the age of 14, she decided to pursue a career in medicine to “render to my poor suffering country women the true medical aid they so sadly stand in need of and which they would rather die than accept at the hands of a male physician.” 
Read more via The Huffington Post.

halftheskymovement:

In 1873, Harvard gynecologist Edward H. Clarke wrote that women who went to college risked “neuralgia, uterine disease, hysteria, and other derangements of the nervous system.” In his words, a woman’s “system never does two things well at the same time.”

Meet Anandibai Joshi, Keiko Okami and Sabat Islambouli, three women who defied gender norms and became the first licensed female doctors in their respective countries: India, Japan and Syria. They graduated  from the first women’s medical college in the world — the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania — at a time when women in America couldn’t vote. Joshi, the best known of the three, was married off at the age of nine, to a 20-year-old man. After losing her 10-day-old baby at the age of 14, she decided to pursue a career in medicine to “render to my poor suffering country women the true medical aid they so sadly stand in need of and which they would rather die than accept at the hands of a male physician.” 

Read more via The Huffington Post.

intelligibledirigible

intelligibledirigible:

using nothing more than newton’s laws of gravitation, we astronomers can confidently predict that several billion years from now our home galaxy, the milky way, will merge with our neighbouring galaxy, andromeda. because the distances between the stars are so great compared to their sizes, few if any stars in either galaxy will actually collide.
any life on the worlds of that far off future should be safe, but they will be treated to an amazing billion-year-long lightshow.
a dance of a half a trillion stars, to music first heard on one little world, by a man who had but one true friend.

distances between the stars are so great compared to their sizes

That animation is beautiful.  Thank God we live in an age where science & technology & art are such good friends. 

infinity-imagined

infinity-imagined:

Artistic microscope slides produced in the Victorian era (1840~1900) by arranging hundreds of tiny diatoms into intricate patterns.  This was often accomplished by using a single hair to move the diatoms in a special chamber that prevented disturbance to the slide.  The fabrication of these amazing objects must have required incredible patience, attention to detail, and a steady hand.

bijoux-et-mineraux
bijoux-et-mineraux:

Gibeon Meteorite - NamibiaGibeon is a meteorite that fell in prehistoric times in Namibia. It was named after the nearest town, Gibeon. This very beautiful and unusual meteorite was first found in 1836, although native inhabitants knew about it before then. Most specimens show flight markings and evidence of a violent atmospheric breakup. It has a fine octahedrite pattern when etched and is very resistant to rust because of the tight fitting crystals, lack of inclusions, and high nickel content. Radiometric dating places the age of crystallization of the iron-nickel metal in the Gibeon at 4 billion years.

This gives me chills.

bijoux-et-mineraux:

Gibeon Meteorite - Namibia

Gibeon is a meteorite that fell in prehistoric times in Namibia. It was named after the nearest town, Gibeon. This very beautiful and unusual meteorite was first found in 1836, although native inhabitants knew about it before then. Most specimens show flight markings and evidence of a violent atmospheric breakup. It has a fine octahedrite pattern when etched and is very resistant to rust because of the tight fitting crystals, lack of inclusions, and high nickel content. Radiometric dating places the age of crystallization of the iron-nickel metal in the Gibeon at 4 billion years.

This gives me chills.