swordgirl

A new breed of cat that looks like a werewolf and behaves like a dog has been discovered.

swordgirl:

hello-the-future:

tamorapierce:

did-you-kno:

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It’s called the ‘Lykoi’.  Due to a genetic mutation in a domestic shorthair cat, the Lykoi has no hair around its eyes, nose, ears and muzzle, giving it a werewolfish appearance.

I want one!  I want one!  I will hug him and pet him and I will call him Hugh Jackman!

Where can I go to get one of these cats are they domesticated to be my best friend yet

Also thought this was Cricket’s post.

It is now.

But, like, have we learned nothing from The Island of Doctor Moreau?  I don’t like how we humans manipulate other species away from their natural, healthy bodies into shapes that amuse us.  I feel a diatribe coming on.

UPDATE: Posted. (Bonus.)

robertogreco
robertogreco:

“Yuki Kageyama: Exploring Japan’s Secret Hideouts for Grown-Ups”

A base or a hideout. Well, whatever you called it — you can bet that you had one as a kid. But it’s not just about larking around when young. Hideouts can also be hubs for alternate ways of living, a refuge and a means of returning to a more innocent childhood world.
Hideouts are necessary spaces in everyday life and function like an abode. Since we are thinking about all things related to Japanese homes at the moment, when we heard about a new book by Yuki Kageyama called “Secret Hideouts for Grown-Ups”, we were intrigued to say the least. It introduces a range of examples from around Japan and also pointers on how to create a hideout yourself.


Well, I need this to be translated into English ASAP, plskthx.

robertogreco:

Yuki Kageyama: Exploring Japan’s Secret Hideouts for Grown-Ups

A base or a hideout. Well, whatever you called it — you can bet that you had one as a kid. But it’s not just about larking around when young. Hideouts can also be hubs for alternate ways of living, a refuge and a means of returning to a more innocent childhood world.

Hideouts are necessary spaces in everyday life and function like an abode. Since we are thinking about all things related to Japanese homes at the moment, when we heard about a new book by Yuki Kageyama called “Secret Hideouts for Grown-Ups”, we were intrigued to say the least. It introduces a range of examples from around Japan and also pointers on how to create a hideout yourself.

Well, I need this to be translated into English ASAP, plskthx.

johndarnielle
johndarnielle:

dubdobdee:

a post about imaginary islands in the medieval quest to map the atlantic, and c.s.lewis’s deployment of same: http://freakytrigger.co.uk/ft/2014/06/narnian-origins-imagined-islands-in-the-great-green-sea-of-gloom/

not sure I concur with dubdobdee about when Lewis is at his most potent (the Queen’s speech at the stone table was one of young JD’s earliest experiences of what Louise Bogan may have called “the shimmer of evil” - but what did she mean? I first saw the phrase wrongly attributed to Baudelaire, which afforded it a sort auto-definition; the Queen’s speech, anyhow, the moment when desolation arrives or seems to: Tolkien did it better, maybe, but only maybe) but this piece is a really terrific read, is the point

He’s right, it was good:

I can’t really claim that C.S. Lewis ever read Donald S.Johnson’s Phantom Islands of the Atlantic: the Legends of Seven Lands that Never Were (since he died some three decades before its 1994 publication), but I am morally certain he had visited some of Johnson’s sources, long before Johnson.

johndarnielle:

dubdobdee:

a post about imaginary islands in the medieval quest to map the atlantic, and c.s.lewis’s deployment of same: http://freakytrigger.co.uk/ft/2014/06/narnian-origins-imagined-islands-in-the-great-green-sea-of-gloom/

not sure I concur with dubdobdee about when Lewis is at his most potent (the Queen’s speech at the stone table was one of young JD’s earliest experiences of what Louise Bogan may have called “the shimmer of evil” - but what did she mean? I first saw the phrase wrongly attributed to Baudelaire, which afforded it a sort auto-definition; the Queen’s speech, anyhow, the moment when desolation arrives or seems to: Tolkien did it better, maybe, but only maybe) but this piece is a really terrific read, is the point

He’s right, it was good:

I can’t really claim that C.S. Lewis ever read Donald S.Johnson’s Phantom Islands of the Atlantic: the Legends of Seven Lands that Never Were (since he died some three decades before its 1994 publication), but I am morally certain he had visited some of Johnson’s sources, long before Johnson.