asiansnotstudying
deafmuslimpunx:

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Killing Her for Kindness
Parveen Rehman was shot and killed by four unknown gunman in Karachi, Pakistan on March 13, 2013. She was virtually unknown outside of her home nation but within the Islamic republic she was known as a champion for the poor. 
Ms. Rehman joined the Orangi Pilot Project in 1982 to work in local Katchi abadis, “poor people’s housing.”Although these abadis are home to 15 million residents of Pakistan’s capital, Karachi (which has a total population of 21 million), they do not officially exist. The Orangi abadi has one million residents.
The Orangi Pilot Project - which is composed of three separate organizations - worked to bring basic sanitation, clean water, and education to the residents. This was done by encouraging the residents to undertake much of the infrastructure development themselves.
Ms. Rehman personally fought corruption in a very corrupt city. She publicly challenged those who stole the public water supply as well as the those taking abadi land. As Karachi grew it absorbed the land on which abadis stood, then speculators would come in, take the land, throw off the residents and sell it at a profit.
Ms. Rehman, who once called in a group of rival gunman to face off against previous attackers because the police were not reliable, was 56 years old when she was murdered.
Sources: NPR (with a great interview by Steve Inskeep), BBC, Dawn.com, and The Orangi Pilot Project
(Image of Ms. Rehman is from NPR and taken by Tracy Wahl - who corrected me very nicely. Follow her!)
Also take time to read about former Mexican mayor Maria Santos Gorrostieta who was assassinated in 2012.

 Inaa lillaahi WA inaa illayhi raji’oon. Rest in Peace.

deafmuslimpunx:

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Killing Her for Kindness

Parveen Rehman was shot and killed by four unknown gunman in Karachi, Pakistan on March 13, 2013. She was virtually unknown outside of her home nation but within the Islamic republic she was known as a champion for the poor. 

Ms. Rehman joined the Orangi Pilot Project in 1982 to work in local Katchi abadis, “poor people’s housing.”Although these abadis are home to 15 million residents of Pakistan’s capital, Karachi (which has a total population of 21 million), they do not officially exist. The Orangi abadi has one million residents.

The Orangi Pilot Project - which is composed of three separate organizations - worked to bring basic sanitation, clean water, and education to the residents. This was done by encouraging the residents to undertake much of the infrastructure development themselves.

Ms. Rehman personally fought corruption in a very corrupt city. She publicly challenged those who stole the public water supply as well as the those taking abadi land. As Karachi grew it absorbed the land on which abadis stood, then speculators would come in, take the land, throw off the residents and sell it at a profit.

Ms. Rehman, who once called in a group of rival gunman to face off against previous attackers because the police were not reliable, was 56 years old when she was murdered.

Sources: NPR (with a great interview by Steve Inskeep), BBC, Dawn.com, and The Orangi Pilot Project

(Image of Ms. Rehman is from NPR and taken by Tracy Wahl - who corrected me very nicely. Follow her!)

Also take time to read about former Mexican mayor Maria Santos Gorrostieta who was assassinated in 2012.

Inaa lillaahi WA inaa illayhi raji’oon. Rest in Peace.

ayjay

Labor Activist Li Qiang wants you to know that the iPhone 4 in his pocket is not an endorsement of Apple’s policies, just an acknowledgement that the company is doing a better job of monitoring factory conditions than its peers. The founder of leading advocacy group China Labor Watch (CLW) told us that, though the Cupertino company does more-thorough inspections than competitors, it is responsible for poor working conditions at its suppliers’ factories and needs to invest some of its record-breaking profits in improving them.

“Although I know that the iPhone 4 is made at sweat shop factories in China, I still think that this is the only choice, because Apple is actually one of the best. Actually before I made a decision, I compared Apple with other cell phone companies, such as Nokia,” he said through a translator. “And the conditions in those factories are worse than the ones of Apple.”

Cut off from the outside world, in a featureless cell, his mind began to panic. “I realized you need information to stay alive. When there’s no information, you’re already dead. It’s a very, very strong test—I think more severe than any physical punishment,” Ai says.

“They follow you around until you have no energy and break down. It’s very successful. It’s a hundred departments, you can’t fight them,” he says. “You should commit suicide before you have to go through this … the tax bureau and the court and the police are the same person with different faces. You know this from the beginning. If you play a chess game, and play two or three moves, they throw the board away.”

Ai believes the world shares responsibility for what’s happening in China, and he wants to force the international community to pay attention. “Today, the West feels very shy about human rights and the political situation. They’re in need of money. But every penny they borrowed or made from China has really come as a result of how this nation sacrificed everybody’s rights,” he says. “With globalization and the Internet, we all know it. Don’t pretend you don’t know it. The Western politicians—shame on them if they say they’re not responsible for this. It’s getting worse, and it will keep getting worse.”

"…No one should use the law as revenge to destroy someone who holds different ideas. To destroy artists who freely express themselves, by using this kind of dirty trick.” If a country resorts to silencing its people with sham laws, he says, “this kind of nation has no future, if things like this happen. Aesthetically, morally, you’ve already failed. You win the battles, because you have power, but you’ve lost the war.”