archaeologicalnews

New Inca road to Machu Picchu discovered

archaeologicalnews:

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Archaeologists have discovered a new section of Inca Road— and this one leads right to Machu Picchu.

According to Andina news agency, the newly discovered road is about one and a half kilometers long, and varies between 1.2 and 1.4 meters in breadth, depending on the terrain. The road begins at Wayraqtambo and leads up to a platform from which travelers can see parts of the complex at Machu Picchu.

Right now, much of the road is covered in vegetation and therefore difficult to sée. El Comercio reports that specialists are working to clear the road. Read more.

!!!

archaeologicalnews

These Are The World’s Oldest Pants

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Two men whose remains were recently excavated from tombs in western China put their pants on one leg at a time, just like the rest of us. But these nomadic herders did so between 3,300 and 3,000 years ago, making their trousers the oldest known examples of this innovative apparel, a new study finds.

With straight-fitting legs and a wide crotch, the ancient wool trousers resemble modern riding pants, says a team led by archaeologists Ulrike Beck and Mayke Wagner of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin. The discoveries, uncovered in the Yanghai graveyard in China’s Tarim Basin, support previous work suggesting that nomadic herders in Central Asia invented pants to provide bodily protection and freedom of movement for horseback journeys and mounted warfare, the scientists report May 22 in Quaternary International. Read more.

For swordgirl, because it’s important to study your enemies. 

archaeologicalnews

Battered pot found in Cornish garage unlocks Egypt excavation secrets

archaeologicalnews:

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A battered pot found in a garage in Cornwall, broken in antiquity and broken again and mended with superglue some 5,500 years later, was treasure – but the scruffy little cardboard label it held is now unlocking a lost history of finds from excavations in Egypt scattered across the world in the late 19th century.

The pot came with an odd family legend that back in the 1950s it was accepted in lieu of a fare by a taxi driver in High Wycombe. Alice Stevenson, curator at the Petrie Museum in London, which among its 80,000 objects has the original excavation records and hundreds of pieces from the same Egyptian cemetery, believes the story is true and may even have identified the mysterious passenger. Read more.

archaeologicalnews

7,000-year-old cave paintings found in Spain

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Archaeologists in eastern Spain have discovered 12 prehistoric rock paintings depicting hunting scenes from 7,000 years ago.

Town hall representatives in the Valencian municipality of Vilafranca announced the finding on Tuesday, the first of its kind and importance for many years in the region.

Although archaeologists are still searching the area for more rock paintings, their work has already unveiled detailed depictions of prehistoric hunting; including bulls, goats and archers chasing them down.

The site’s location is being kept a secret until the necessary security precautions are in place. Read more.

archaeologicalnews

Ancient Puppy Paw Prints Found on Roman Tiles

archaeologicalnews:

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The paw prints and hoof prints of a few meddlesome animals have been preserved for posterity on ancient Roman tiles recently discovered by archeologists in England.

"They are beautiful finds, as they represent a snapshot, a single moment in history," said Nick Daffern, a senior project manager with Wardell Armstrong Archaeology. "It is lovely to imagine some irate person chasing a dog or some other animal away from their freshly made tiles."

The artifacts, which could be nearly 2,000 years old, were found in the Blackfriars area of Leicester, the English city where the long-lost bones of King Richard III were discovered under a parking lot in 2012. Read more.

archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

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A face carved into a tree trunk was discovered by forestry workers in a remote location up Toba Inlet. It had been staring down an ancient river valley in the rainforest for almost 200 years.

The recent chance discovery was made approximately 60 miles up the inlet and helped to silence a question of doubt regarding the geographic limits of Klahoose First Nation traditional territory.

What a creepy cool discovery to make in the middle of nowhere.

The article goes on to say that the tree was “removed from the site” to a community center, which I really hope means that it was relocated root ball & all, because cutting it down now after such a life would be so unfair. 

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f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Lost Underwater Lion City: Rediscovery of China’s ‘Atlantis

Qiandao Lake is a man-made lake located in Chun’an County, China, where archeologists have discovered in 2001 ruins of an underwater city. The city is at a depth of 26-40 meters and was named “Lion City”. There would have been 290,000 people living in this city during more than 1300 years.